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Two months since the last post and Scout has really grown. He is nearly as big as his two brothers Monty and Olly now.

We have been concentrating on his core obedience skills, socialisation and getting used to lots of different environments.

He is getting good at walking to heel, laying down on command, recall (when not distracted by something, anything else). We have been having problems getting Scout to speak but this turned out to be his handlers fault for not being so animated. The training really is for me, the handler, and not Scout.

A good way of socialisation is for Scout to meet lots of dogs and people. So he walks three times a day up at the common and once at night around his local neighbourhood. He comes with me to team meetings and equipment nights at Woodhead Mountain Rescue Team, but he is too young to take on exercises yet.

Another good socialisation exercise is to take Scout shopping. His favourite place is PetsatHome. There are some really nice assistants who give him lots of attention plus there are all those different smells of food and pets and people. His favourite place in all the store is under the food shelves where all the spilled food collects. There are lots of other dogs there too so he gets to meet and be friendly. He is really good at ignoring dogs that do not want to play and doesn’t let it bother him.

Now he is a little older, 5 months on August 1st, he can take part in SARDA training days. He has been on two weekends now, training in puppy class and won the heart of Jacquie Hall the trainer. He did well too, once again its me who is the problem. Scout has also started training at night and on Sundays locally, which introduces him to more handlers and dogs. All the handlers are so helpful, everyone just wants the dogs to do well. I learned some useful tips along the way, one of the most important was to plan the exercise out first on my own before involving Scout and being exact in what I say to him. Consistency and repetition are the keys here.

Different environments are also important, to increase his confidence in mixed habitats and help him be comfortable overcoming things that are new to him. July saw Scout take his first wild swimming sessions, thankfully he loves the water. He does a wonderful breast stoke, good and strong. The only problem is getting him out of the water, even when he is shivering, which means me going in to get him. We also took him on a wild camp with his brothers and they all loved it, settling straight down for the night even with a river running close by and geese flying overhead.

A good two months for Scout. Lots of fun and lots of learning. He is well on his way now, working towards his first benchmark the obedience test.