Red Algae on Ash trees

Alison and I had a really nice walk in Wharncliffe Woods today. This is a forestry commission woodland with excellent rails for MTB, horses and walking. The surrounding area also has an ancient Chase, impressive crags and lots of wildlife including deer, owls, and a wide variety of bird life.

There was a hint of spring on the way today, the sun warming the air. I noticed the Red Algae on these Ash trees. It forms on the north side because this is where the bark is most moist and that makes it a good breeding ground for the Algae. It’s a natural way of telling which way is north. The Algae only appears on the north side in the northern hemisphere, in the southern hemisphere its is the southern side of the tree.

Another thing that is interesting about Red Algae is that it used to only really appear in the more temperate south of England, the north being too cold. So this may just be a harbinger of warmer times in the north.

Author: Paul Besley

Writer I have spent most of my life escaping in to Britains National Parks and wilderness areas. I have grown to love the solitude it can bring and I like to share this with others either through guiding people or through my writing. I now spend half my life either as a ranger, guide or writer, involved with the natural landscape we are all a part of. It is these experiences that I wish to write and share about.