Biting the hand that saves you.

12279171_920157301386233_3117764084929594927_n

Back a year ago I was volunteering as a Ranger for the Peak District National Park working out of Fairholmes in the Upper Derwent Valley. The job entailed keeping the place looking nice, I learned how to dig a post hole and put a post in that would stay upright true as a flagpole without the use of concrete. Then there was the guided walks, members of the public being shown the natural beauty of the place plus some interesting areas where, if you knew how to look, you could still see how early man had inhabited the landscape, burning platforms, rock marks, old ways. Another part was taking trainees out on patrol, I liked this bit because the newcomers were always eager to learn, until one day I met a man who’s name I now forget but I never forgot what he said.

He was a doctor from Sheffield. Due to retire at 50-ish he wanted something to fill his time and fancied himself as a Ranger. He came on a pre training day to see if he would like it before joining the official programme. As we sat in the Ranger centre waiting to be told where to go that day we talked and somehow the topic of Mountain Rescue came to the fore. The doctor says he hates them, always rattling their tins at people when everyone knew they wasted money, why only last month he’d seen around 40 people turn up on a callout just think how much that cost. I was stunned, I’d never heard anyone talk like that about MR. I explained to him how a callout works and about the fact that MR is full of volunteers, just volunteers, no one gets paid. He retorted that it was a waste of money and he wasn’t going to fund people who wanted to play hero.

I was asked to take him out on patrol and against my better judgement I did. The weather was poor, hail and snow blowing horizontally. We worked our way up to Howden Edge, him doing the nav. When we topped out he gave up and said he wanted to go down, this was no weather to be out in. What became of him I don’t know. I left shortly after that and partly because of that. If this was the kind of person the service was attracting it wasn’t for me.

This week Peak District Mountain Rescue teams received a callout to support one of the Pennine teams in the search for a man lost and injured on the Pennine moors. The operation had been going all night and it carried on into next day. A total of 100 Mountain Rescue members from teams across the north of England along with 13 search dogs and handlers, air support and police were involved in the operation. The gentleman was found safe and with only slight injuries. At the rendezvous point I surveyed the number of vehicles, listened to team members saying they had to get back to work and it was a three-hour drive back, so they best be on their way. Many had come straight from working a night shift or were heading back to do a full days work. They grabbed a cup of coffee and a biscuit and were off. None were paid; most had spent heavily to get there in lost wages, fuel and food. All for a man they had never met and probably never would. And they would do it all again because that is the kind of people they are, not heroes, just men and women who know that somewhere someone is in distress and is in need of help.

Scout trainee search and rescue dog

Scout
Scout. Trainee Search and Rescue Dog. Photo Mark Harrison

Its been a bit of a week for Scout my trainee Mountain Rescue search and rescue Border Collie. On a training exercise Monday night, Scout had to find a hidden person, Paul Richmond, a friend who regularly gives up his Monday nights to act as a body for Scout. He set off searching woodland as he normally does, trying to detect any scent from a human in the air and unknown to me, picked up the scent of two people lost in the woods, without a torch and unable to get out to safety.

Scout still has a year of training to do, but he performed, exactly as he should, returning to tell me he had found some people then making multiple runs between them and me guiding me to their location. They were a little scared and desperate to get out of the woods. Scout an I escorted them out and then Scout continued on with his search to find Paul, eventually locating him and bringing me to his position.

It’s a big moment in his development, he did what he had trained to do, without thought or hesitation. I am so proud of him.

Scouts progress in Search and Rescue

Scout training on Eyam Moor, Peak District National Park
Scout training on Eyam Moor, Peak District National Park

Training a SARDA Search and Rescue dog takes time and patience, mainly on the part of the dog, because it is the handler who is most/always at fault. Scout always comes up with the goods, in the way of a find. He worked hard on Eyam Moor this weekend in hard conditions. The bracken is still dense and hard to get through, combined with deep snow, it makes it extra tiring for Scout to get around. He battled his way around to find three hidden bodies, with little scent moving about to guide him, so he really had to work for it. He started to get tired after find number two, I could tell he was needing a break.

Tiredness is something I have been working on with him. Taking him on long moorland walks, he probably runs about three times the distance I walk. It’s good to get him working over rough ground, boulder fields are particularly good, if you have ever tried negotiating a boulder field in summer, think about it under thick slippery snow where you cannot see the gaps.

The other major work is building up the return sequence. This is where he finds a body and returns back to get me then lead me back to the body. It is an important tool, especially when covering large areas effectively. He soon got the hang of the sequence, and then worked out that if he starts returning to me and he can see that I can see him, he doesn’t need to come all the way back, but can just bark his command. Pretty sneaky and clever of him to work that one out. I need him back to me, because we may be out of sight from each other and I need to know for definite that he has a find.

Training is frustrating. Sleepless nights, going over and over what went wrong on the last session and how to correct it. Worrying over whether he will make the grade. But, when it goes right, when he works his socks off and I don’t screw it up, it is the best feeling in the world.

 

 

Search and Rescue Dogs – Peak District

Its raining cats and dogs in Sheffield this morning. Scout my trainee Search and Rescue Dog and I are off down to Dartmoor where it seems to be just as wet.

We are going for a weekend of training on the moors with lots of other dogs, handlers and most importantly the bodies. People and dogs will come from all over England to spend the days training in the techniques of dog search and rescue in hill and mountainous areas.

Scout is a Border Collie, the most common dog used because of their intelligence, hard-working attitude and hardiness in the face of all kinds of weather. Both of the parents of Scout are working sheepdogs on farms in the Lake District and Scout has a few half brothers also in Mountain Rescue.

The training I guess, is really about the handler, the weakest link in the team. It is the handler who has to find the right combination of rewards that promotes the behaviour required in the dog. Training is reward based, infinitely better than any other option. The dogs want to do it.

When Scout sets off on a run to find a body, he is really wanting his toy, a ball on a string. If he gets that he is happy and will repeat the behaviour time and again.

Some say it’s a bit like training men.

It’s mostly women that say that, but only to each other.

One Year Old

Its Scouts birthday today. Born on 29th February 2016. Scout is a Killiebrae Border Collie and comes from working sheepdog parents. He is also a trainee search and rescue dog for SARDA England, the Search and Rescue Dog Association of England, and works with me in Mountain Rescue.

Scout joined our family about 10 months ago. He has a lovely nature and fits in well. Scout started hi SARDA training when he was twelve weeks old and he just loves been out on the hill, learning how to find people and ultimately find his toy, which is his reward.

Scout was named after Kinder Scout and also the character Scout in Harper Lees book, To Kill a Mockingbird. On Kinder Scout there is a triangulation pillar known as the Scout Trig so it all seemed to fit in.

Now he is a little older we can go for longer walks and I get to spend time with him in a none training environment, which has resulted in us becoming firm buddies.

Happy birthday Scout.

SARDA Registration

Scout reached a milestone this weekend at the SARDA training camp in the Brecon Beacons. He went there to carry on with his obedience training for his registration test that allows him on to the formal Search Dog training programme. The trainers had other ideas, the first being a final stock test, he had passed two already.

The stock test involves being placed in a field with a flock of sheep, about 60 this time and then have the sheep run past and be ignored by Scout. Have them walk in between Scout and me his handler and then come back to me on a recall through the sheep, still ignoring them. Then getting his favourite ball from the middle of the sheep and still ignoring them. He passed with flying colours.

The second and unexpected test is called the Registration Test and a pass formally allows the dog on to the training programme so it is very important. The first is walk to heel, no problems there. Second is a recall to my feet. All good. Then speak on command, he barked really well. Then a down from a distance on command, he hit the deck good. and finally the big one. A ten minute down stay with 5 minutes of that being out of sight of me his handler. Pass.

He was exactly 8 months old and has worked really hard, whilst maintaining his lovely sweet nature, which I feel is so important. Scout is a very confident dog, happy in his own company but enjoying playing with dogs and humans. I am so proud of him.

The following morning he was presented with his official SARDA training badge in front of all the other handlers. A great moment for a wonderful dog.

In the time he has been with us he  has grown from a puppy in to a teenager. He loves to go to his favourite shop and see his favourite assistant and search for food under the shelves. Taking him in shops and around town where there are noises and people is a great way for him to become accustomed to different sights and sounds and smells.

His favourite place though is out on the moors and hills of the Peak District. He loves Kinder, diving down in to the Groughs, and running along the streams. He especially likes to stand on edges and look out across the moors, you can see him smelling whats out there and he has no fear of the edge and respects the boundary it places on him.

He is happiest working hard on the hills and moors and we are gradually increasing his time out walking so that he does not develop any hip problems. We have many hours in front of us and lots of adventures.

Well done Scout. I am very proud of you.

Growing Up

This is me aged seven months old at Edale Moor Triangulation Pillar on Kinder Scout. It’s known as the Scout Trig as it carries a memorial plaque to the Venture Scout unit from the area.

I was named after Kinder Scout, the highest point in the Peak District. This was my first visit there and I loved it. My bones are still not totally set yet so I still have to take it steady and not do too much walking. I loved been on the moors and jumping down into the Groughs.

My training is progressing well. I can now walk to heel, recall back to my handler, sit and lay down. I am working on my down stay out of sight and once that is done then I am ready for registration so that I can start my formal training in search and rescue.

I have done two stock tests which I passed, ignoring sheep whilst close to them

On Kinder Scout I saw my first Mountain Hare. It suddenly popped up from nowhere and ran off at lightning speed.

I’m really loving my training and want to be out on the hills as much as possible.