Derwent Village – Peak District

Brick made by Skyers Spring. Found in the remains of Derwent Village. Peak District
Brick made by Skyers Spring. Found in the remains of Derwent Village. Peak District

Here is a little bit of social industrial history.

I found this brick sat in the remains of the flooded Peak District village of Derwent, it was sat in the mud on what would have been the main street. The brick was made at Skyers Spring brickworks in Hoyland, Barnsley around 1880 and found its way to the village for some use or other. It is an engineering brick, not used for adornment, so probably formed some infrastructure of the village.

It probably travelled over via Penistone, either across Strines along the Mortimer Road and then hang a right at Moscar Cross, up the bridleway to Whinstone Lee Tor and then down via Grindle Barn to the village. Or alternatively via Cut Gate from Langsett over the top and into the Upper Derwent Valley. The brickworks were run by James Smith and had connections to the Earls Fitzwilliam, who still have extensive shooting moors along the Strines Road. There was extensive trade between the two areas which accounts for the routes across the tops. It’s nice to see artifacts around that were from local sources.

 

National Parks a dying landscape

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It is an odd time in the nations National Parks at the moment, they seem to be confused as to their purpose, their reason for being. It comes at a time when funding is being cut from central government and the political and economic mood of certain ascendant sections of society are for profit.

The latest furore to hit social media is the Thirlmere Zip Wire. People resigning in protest from organisations, business manoeuvring to get their way in the dash for cash. In the Peak District it’s now about false tartan, in plush cafes with cuddly toys on the shelves for the grandparents to buy before they set off back to Sheffield or Derby. Meanwhile the BMC take people out on to the moors at night to educate and illuminate, raise funds for path repairs and generally act as guardians of the park.

Commentators speak about going back to the original reason for the national parks and often quote Sandford in support of one stance or another. One thing that is familiar with the Thirlmere Zip Wire argument is that lots of people speaking against it were never actually born there, but moved there because of its beauty and their own love of the place, they often quote Wordsworth in their argument to keep the Lake District in aspic.

One thing that is striking about the White Peak is how empty the villages are and how many cottages, its always the nice ones, have their doors and windows painted in those pretend national trust colours so favoured by the middle classes. The gentrification of the White Peak is gathering apace, cottages inhabited by retiring oldies who pop off every friday in their Disco’s to shop at Waitrose and come back in their 4×4 laden down with frozen goods to stock up their Wickes kitchens with the granite worktops. Apart from the chintzy names that now adorn the cottages another sign to be seen is the country holiday let. A small plastic holder with leaflets or tiny cards giving the contact details of the owner should you want to book. It usually accompanies an old milk churn, or scythe, something that can add “authenticity” to the “look”. Walk through any village now and you can count on more than one hand the number of such dwellings.

These ghost villages once provided housing and work for young people, who had families and kept things alive. Now the villages are bereft of life, part of a landscape that is now a set in a giant government funded theme park. The locals forced out by low wages and high house prices and no employment. The national park seems to be a landscape that is dying, killed by the very people who profess to be its protectors. It’s now just a photo opportunity and a means to make money.

Perhaps we need to go back to Wordsworth, often quoted in any Lake District battle to preserve what people want as the status quo.

When responding to the proposal to build a railway to Windermere to bring tourists to view the wonderful landscape and bring in much needed revenue for the local economy he said, and I paraphrase, that members of the working class would be unable to appreciate the beauty and character that the area had to offer and concludes that bringing so many travellers in would destroy the landscape.

He may just have been correct.

Tideswell Church – Peak District

Tideswell Church Door. White Peak Walks. Peak District National Park. Author Paul Besley. Publisher Cicerone Press
Tideswell Church Door. White Peak Walks. Peak District National Park

I love church doors and entrance porches. The church door of St John the Baptist, Tideswell in the Peak District is a real beauty. The door is oak, hand carved with beautiful fluting and studding.

Quam Dilecta is from the second line of Psalm 83;

Quam dilecta tabernacula tua Domine virtutum

How lovely are thy tabernacles, O Lord of host!

An indication of what lay on the other side of the door in the Cathedral of the Peak. The church is well worth a visit with some beautiful Poppy Heads showing the stages of a humans life from birth to death.

Poppy Head in Tideswell Church depicting the Baptism. Tideswell. White Peak. Peak District. White Peak Walks East. Author Paul Besley. Publisher Cicerone Press
Poppy Head in Tideswell Church. Peak District

Navio Roman Fort – Peak District

Navio Roman fort at Brough in the Peak District National Park. White Peak Walks East. Author Paul Besley. Publisher Cicerone Press
Navio Roman fort at Brough in the Peak District National Park

I always try to have something to look at on a walk and walking in the White Peak area of the Peak District National Park means there is a plethora of things to view and wonder at.

I recently did a walk for my new book White Peak Walks East, published by Cicerone Press along the boundary between the white and dark areas of the Peak. It’s a place full of ancient sites with a history going back to neolithic times. A very productive period was in Roman times, this part of the world getting towards the northern edge of their domain.

My walk took in Navio, the Roman fort at Brough. It is one of a number of forts linking Templeborough, Melandra, Castleshaw. There is not a deal left now, a few stones in a hole in the middle of a field, the stones may or may not be connected. But you can still discern the square plinth of the fort, raised above the surrounding land. It is near a stream and has views in all directions across both the Derwent and Hope valley’s. A good spot to check movements. As often is the case, it now sits alongside major roads and junctions, I always find it amazing how we still walk and live in the places designed for us many thousands of years ago.

Dark Peak Walks book review

It is always pleasing to get feedback like this. Thank you Ann and Austin.

Wow and Wow again. What a beautiful beautiful book.

We both individually turned to one of our favourite walks from days gone by. (Page 168) Your description of the series of water falls at Birchin Clough and the cacophony of notes, filled my heart and mind with memories and the sheer joy of it all. I am sitting here amazed.

And then my Ann said have you seen this? Showing me the inside of the wrapping paper, WOW! Could it ever be that my adventures could ever begin again? Only time will tell. As for now Paul, I/we will always want the good times to continue for you both, now and forever (and for Scout)

And also, never did I imagine that I’d be considering framing a piece of brown paper with a few special words written on or that I coil up a length of Sisal string to placed in a memory box.

All in all you have “done good” well done that man.

Thank you.

Austin and Ann

Please Vote for Dark Peak Walks in this years TGO awards here

Lead mining in the Peak District

Reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland. http://maps.nls.uk/index.html

The White Peak area of the Peak District National Park is punctured with lead mines. Often the small indentations in the earth string out along the landscape as the miners followed the lead veins below.

Many have now been lost on the present day Ordnance Survey OL24 map but thankfully surveyors in the 19th century placed many features on their maps, so looking back can reveal places of interest well worth visiting.

White Peak Characteristics – Peak District

Spend enough time in an area and you quickly pick up the distinctive features that make up a places character.

The photo above has many features that characterise the White Peak area of the Peak District National Park. The limestone, and limestone walls. The narrow lanes leading to fields, walled on each side by limestone. The dewpond now covered in grass through lack of use, like many more in the White Peak. The pasture with its green grass, often Italian grass is used for its high sugar content and suitability for silage. The barn, squarish in structure, limestone walls with dressed corners and a stone roof. The ancient trees that denote the line of boundaries prior to walling under the enclosure acts.

All that is missing from this photo is the tiny hamlet or small village with Norman church and the odd sheep staring at the camera.